Shipping Container School Built In Four Weeks After Earthquake In Chile

Shipping Container School Built In Four Weeks After Earthquake In ChileShipping Container School Built In Four Weeks After Earthquake In Chile

Photos: VientoFuerte.cl.

When a tsunami hit Chile a devastated town left in its wake lost its school, local university students were able to rebuild the school within four weeks. Tabul is around 500km south west of Santiago and one of the worst areas hit by the tsunami. Finis Terrae University architecture department brought 56 of its advance students to design, equip and mount the school in the damaged town under the project name Viento Fuerte (Strong Wind).

A local company donated the 22 shipping container units needed where were insulated and designed round the concept of prefabricated building modules. 20 of the containers remained on the ground level while the last two were mounted on the first floor. An open area was formed between the containers to act as areas that can offer shade from the sun as well as rain cover for the children, with the remaining part of the existing school adjoined to the containers.

It shows how much can be done in 4 weeks and a video was put together of the project shown below :-

 

DEMO TUBUL INGLES from STBFilms on Vimeo.

 

Shipping Container School Built In Four Weeks After Earthquake In ChileShipping Container School Built In Four Weeks After Earthquake In ChileShipping Container School Built In Four Weeks After Earthquake In Chile

Shipping container homes in Japan – Tsunami disaster relief

Ex-Container project is a joint effort to deal with the widespread displaced populations after the recent earthquake and tsunami that hit Japan. Rapid constructive, quick to site and cheap are all positive reasons that made containers the ideal home to be implimented for the housing crisis. Although this isn’t reusing shipping containers but in fact fabricating new ones to fit in with Japanese regulations it also help speed up the completion times of homes as well as reduce unneeded materials. E.g. if you look at the photo below you can see 3/4 of the floor space is missing as the container below it has the floor/ceiling. This reduces transportation costs and gets the units to where they are needed quicker. The information on where the units came from is a bit sketchy but a previous project quotes a factory in Thailand which would make sense with the current issues within Japan affecting its manufacturing industries.

Reading up on the buildings they are only allowed to be sited for a maximum of 2 years due to Japanese construction codes. Although hopefully by this time the displaced people would have started to rebuild their lives and their buildings. At the same time I do wonder where all the units will go afterwards, I know in the UK we move them around site to site for construction work and I could see this being the case of utilizing these buildings in some other way than just stacking them up incase of another disaster.

 

shipping container home being dropped into place - Japan container home being constructed in Thailand container homes japan container homes japanex-container project - JapanBayside Marina Hotel (Yokohama, Japan)