Shipping Containers for sale – Pasig City, Philippines

3 x 20ft Shipping containers available for sale and collection this week. Must be gone by Thursday ( Jan.14,2016 ). Located at the EEI home base Pasig City. Philippines. The containers are P30,000 each ready to go!

Someone did email me the other day regarding containers but there were none available these came in this morning. Will be adding a Sales/Wanted for containers this week for the site to help make it easier for people to find each other online.

Please email direct:- here

 

Power for Barangays in the Philippines could it be a reality?

Bio mass power plant in the Philippines

The container structures are pretty obvious as well as the solar water heaters but what may not be so visual is organic power generation. Its not new technology either like most things sustainable its been in Africa for over 10 years.

The interesting thing about this technology is that although watching in the video you can see a very large scale operation. Fact is for Barangays it often doesn’t need to be anywhere near the same scale. Just as important is that remote areas can produce their own fuels which in troubled times as such where the Philippines is seeing earthquakes, floods and other natural disasters a solution can be met if cut off from the world.

Adding to that the very fact its using waste products makes it a very useful solution to areas with limited wealth.

The concept for the Philippines I picked up from JC Greg Solutions although its not a new one the thought is in the right place. But I also believe that keeping the systems small and even better out of politicians hands would be the benefit of the communities in the Philippines.

Shipping Container Call Centre.

call centre in a shipping container

A call centre in a shipping container is it viable?

This is an idea I have been looking at lately for expansion for the near future. Its also why I haven’t been so active on the shipping container home front for the blog.

Quite simply I have been extremely busy with other projects one of which is a BPO call centre in the Philippines. The original idea for the call centre work came from my work in Oman where I discovered we were short of certain resources and personnel that could have made life a lot easier. Nothing wrong with the way it was setup and to be fair it was a brand new contract for the division I was working with inside a large company. This was a step away from their usual construction and into the FM industry in Oman. The company is a very large one and is world known for its facilities management but this was a new step in Oman itself.

So how do you get round this and if other countries appear on the radar for similar types of work? They are short-term but could literally be hopping contract to contract for years. The answer was outsourcing to the Philippines.

So when I returned home I built a new office and have been developing the call centre. First issues were not communications or getting the right software but noise pollution. Barking dogs, loud music, motorbikes etc. etc.

Which is why a shipping container call centre sprung to mind. Everytime I have been in a container be it visiting someone’s home or assessing for sale etc. the one thing you notice is the silence. The tropical climate we have here in the Philippines means its hot all day but in the evenings its cold. In fact won’t be needing air conditioning if ventilated correctly.

So would a shipping container call centre work? I believe it not only possible but very likely in the near future here. Because things like the computers could be stored in a secure area at the back of the unit with the large opening doors. While staff have their desks and monitors inside the container unit at the other end. Thus reducing heat build up and also makes it easier for maintenance in a working environment.

If you come across a shipping container call centre please let me know as I would be very interested to hear from others on the idea.

Prefabricated Steel Homes In The Philippines

The last article got me thinking about the issues we have getting our hands on good containers here in the Philippines. In reality it looks like fabricating a container is cheaper than buying a second hand one.

So why not start to think about the external dimensions and look to fabricate instead of buying a shipping container in the first place. Because believe it or not getting fabricated steel sheeting is extremely easy in the Philippines as its primarily used for roofing. The wall cladding is just as easy to get hold of which just leaves the issue of the framing. Can it be done cheaper than buying second hand containers? I am thinking its pretty close the only real difference being with a bit of luck the shipping container is guaranteed on its steel quality. Seeing how quickly things can deteriate here if not maintained properly as well as the fact many things are sub standard does make me worry about the steel. Can it be guaranteed to last?

I think the only people who can answer that is taking a visit to a fabrication plant and discussing it directly. Ignore sales people! you need to talk to the owners and see what guarantees they can offer. So why go with steel cladding instead of concrete?

  • Rapid installation.
  • Frame can be pre-fabricated offsite.
  • Internal walls can be thinner.
  • Exterior is easier to maintain and nicer finish than concrete.
  • Lightweight.
  • Wiring and pipework can be installed internally behind partition walling.

They are but a few things I can think of right now but there many more such as they don’t crack the way concrete does and do the insulation right you’ve got a better property for all weathers.

I am very keen on pre-fabricated houses that are dropped into place but also bearing in mind what if like many homes you drop the concrete slab on for a second floor to build later? This could actually be an easy solution as you can build the place on site if needed with basic hand tools. If there is no concrete floor for the 2nd level you could even remove the roof and drop a premade second floor straight on the support walls from below and having steel joists to support the floor.

A whole new angle here in the Philippines away from the original idea of shipping container housing. But it doesn’t mean we have given up but simply looking at what is most cost affective for our next project.

2x 20ft Shipping Container Livable Apartment Size.

  Size doesn’t matter springs to mind in conversation but often it does in some strange way. Mainly because people don’t realise how much space they aren’t using or more importantly how much electric, cooling,heating they waste for floor space they don’t actually need. Here is the joke though this is the apartment I work from and rent out to tenants, none of which have ever complained about size if anything its bigger than a lot of apartments of the same budget :-

apartment bedroom

We decided to keep it as a studio type (no central wall) to help keep the air flowing as well as giving extra space when needed. There is actually now a wardrobe I built covering the electrical box in the corner to the bed, giving a lot of extra storage space. But as you can see there is even space for an extra sofa bed.

apartment sitting room

Now this is where its funny as you can see the sitting room area isn’t actually being utilised as generally people sit on the sofa bed and watch TV in what would be the bedroom. an 8ft by 10ft floor area not being used.

apartment kitchen

A galley styled kitchen keeps things simple but has everything that people generally need. This is the Philippines so microwave food doesn’t exist so neither does the need for a microwave. Bearing in mind I will add more shelving at the end of the kitchen above the refrigerator for the dry goods.

Well what is the point to all this nice look round an apartment but its not a shipping container?

Fact is I was sat working up here the other night and realised something its smaller than 2 x 20ft containers. But I guess if I did the same with a shipping container and gave more space I bet people would say its “too small” simply because they knew it was made from shipping containers. Yet this has been rented out for over 2 years now with several tenants the last leaving a couple of weeks ago while the next arrives in 2 weeks. Not one person has ever said “its too small”.

A bit of a plus on the shipping container side as simply people have been living in spaces smaller than 2x20ft containers but didn’t even realise. In construction terms though here in the Philippines you could build the same sized home with containers for less than P300,000 can’t give an exact figure simply because container prices fluctuate. But your containers come in at around P60,000 – P100,000 each (big price variance).

Cost Of A Shipping Container In The Philippines

Not sure if other countries suffer with the same but if you don’t want a shipping container they seem to be around P60,000 and as soon as you do they can be as high as P140,000.

Question is why are they so expensive?

In reality I believe its to do with a lack of safety standards and internal shipping. A lot of stuff moves around within the islands of the Philippines and neither conform to or need to conform to international standards. In the same way all the ferries that sank in the Philippines ended up with an investigation into why the ships sank but all comes down to a lack of safety and poor maintenance every time.

So how do you get a good price for a shipping container in the Philippines? I found the best way is to look and ask but never mention you want to buy one. Just keep an eye out for when someone is trying to sell one. Generally I let people know I am after one but have a limited budget and sooner or later someone will turn up at the door telling me there is one for sale.

Most things in the Philippines exist like this though if your buying the price is high if someone is selling they are normally desperate and you can get a bargain.

Container Gardening – SNAP Hydroponics From The Philippines

SNAP Hydroponics

SNAP Hydroponics is something that has been developed in the Philippines for sustainable living and livelihood. What makes it a little unique compared to most hydroponics setups is that it doesn’t need any electricity which is a huge difference in money cost for production. Obviously the Philippines climate is a country receiving 12 hours of sunshine as well as constant heat which helps. But the SNAP solution which is mixed with water is a cheap solution for plant production that is initially designed for leafy plants. Maybe this is the first step towards developing different solutions for different types of plant to get maximum growth while still being organic. But for me living out in the Philippines with these lightweight boxes how many would you fit on a shipping container home roof? The boxes themselves come from discarded fruit boxes normally carrying grapes which means your recycling a product that is normally scrapped. How to make a SNAP hydroponics setup from a fruit box can be found here.

Vodacom Shipping Container Nescafé And Cell phone Load Station Tanzania

A the shipping container turned Vodocom internet café in central Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania.

A sign of changes in Tanzania as it takes on the internet highway with its internet cafes. The interesting thing about this building though is the quantity of computers as here in the Philippines its common to find even hundreds of PCs in an internet cafe if its in a major location. But the Vodacom stations in Tanzania house between 3 and 5 computer stations. Not knocking it as it shows things are improving but also the fact that market demand is still limited. But no doubt in the future it will expand in the same way the Philippines embraced the web.

Kitchen Cabinets Being Installed In A Shipping Container Home

This style of installation is fairly common even here in the Philippines with the front panel being a complete unit. In the UK and probably most of Europe though we generally go for carcass construction which makes individual cabinets that are bolted together to form up the kitchen. Generally more expensive than the method in the video but also they do come raised off the ground which can be helpful for things like cleaning or avoiding damage during floods. A blown out plinth is cheap to replace but looking at either design as the one in the video is using treated wood it would probably hold up well in a minor flood. When I talk about flooding not talking about the burst banks of the Nile for example but things like burst pipes in cold spells when your out.

kitchen carcass

SNAP Hydroponics

SNAP Hydroponics Ideal For Off Grid Living (No Electric Needed)

SNAP Hydroponics

A system developed in the Philippines which involves nutrient solutions seems to have answered one of the big issues here in the Philippines but also makes it an ideal grow method for container housing or other off grid homes, it doesn’t need electric! Basically the method involves a polystyrene tray that has a lid (often found for food delivery) that you cut circular holes for polystyrene cups to use as plant pots in it before lining the bottom of the tray with plastic sheet to waterproof it. In goes the cheap solution mixed with water and pretty much that’s the pots near enough setup except for a bit of medium to secure the plants but also means that once you have established your tray garden you can literally pick your food from the leaves for lettuce and other crops. I am sure the formula can be adapted for other types of plants as well.

Now bearing in mind a shipping container home has a large roof area which is not only flat but suffers with heat build up I am sure this may be a solution to help drop that temperature down while keeping your greens out of the reach of many garden pests. Adding a ladder to the side of your container means your plants are happily growing away on your roof and the fact they are self watering from the solution your not constantly worrying they dry out continuously. The other obvious benefits of SNAP Hydroponics is it can be up scaled or downscaled for winter or personal needs. I am currently researching it more here and going to put an order in for the SNAP solution so I can trial it but it does appear to be a very cheap option of growing greens, which are often overpriced in the Philippines.

SNAP Hydroponics

SNAP Hydroponics