Cozy Connect offers amazing prefab in California.

This Cozy connect prefab in California is it the future of container living?

Connect Homes West Elm Dwell on Design

Connect:Homes came up with this fantastic home design and look to reinvent the modular prefabricated home market. This is their prototype which was shown at Dwell on Design in Los Angeles. Seems so far so good with the idea and the interior design was carried out by Kishani Perera to give it some home touches.

Connect Homes West Elm Perera - kitchen

The Connect:2.1 plan is designed with one bedroom, one bathroom, and a galley kitchen. I can see this having many uses from a stop over retreat, budget first home to retirement housing.

The concept has also gone down the green route with non toxic materials, energy efficient appliances as well as recycled materials such as the surfaces and tiling.

The price isn’t exactly cheap but I am sure it will have many takers at $105,000 although delivery and installation will be extra.

Connect Homes West Elm Perera - interior

Connect Homes West Elm Perera - styling

Connect Homes West Elm Perera - bedroom

Connect Homes West Elm Perera - deck

Klaas Cabin–Malaysia

Klaas Cabin by Kinwai marketing in Malaysia offered this modular home design which I think will stir up a lot of interest in the design not just in Malaysia but most of Asia for those interested in modular design.

I have been talking to Brandon from the company and looking at the design of the home can see why this would be something that could be picked up by many markets in Asia. The first thing being that exterior wise the Klaas cabin has a rather unique and modern feel to it. Which if your used to the concrete jungle like the Philippines where hollow block concrete blocks are king then it brings a nice contrast to everything around us. The exterior cladding no doubt sits on an internal frame work which is then sees ply overlaid on the interior. Ok ply may not suit everyone but in reality its a “choice” and that’s part of modular building the ability to change parts to suit peoples choices and needs.

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The exterior layout with its roof light openings allow a lot of natural light to enter the building throughout the day. Obviously another section that can be altered to suit someone’s needs be it glazed, glass blades or even just vented depending on the persons needs. The wood framing around the windows add a finishing touch will adding a bit of security grilling for the home or office. Finished off with exterior lighting along the length of the building.

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The interior ply walls seem at home in the design which is a little bit strange for me as its not normally a “finished” use product for me. I do use ply like this but generally its flooring or sheeted over and then cladded. but with the wood flooring it looks very at home.

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All in all can see a lot of uses for this here in the Philippines as well as other countries and I am interested to find out more about the structural building and how it fits together. Is it built on a wooden frame, aluminium or steel? Because to be honest I can see my next office being built in the same way as this building with a similar design. I would like to thank Brandon for sharing their company design of their modular home product which by the way hasn’t got the limitations of shipping container dimensions due to being custom built! You can alter the dimensions to suit your needs and land space. You can contact Brandon regarding building enquiries at leisurehaus@yahoo.com

Prefabricated Steel Homes In The Philippines

The last article got me thinking about the issues we have getting our hands on good containers here in the Philippines. In reality it looks like fabricating a container is cheaper than buying a second hand one.

So why not start to think about the external dimensions and look to fabricate instead of buying a shipping container in the first place. Because believe it or not getting fabricated steel sheeting is extremely easy in the Philippines as its primarily used for roofing. The wall cladding is just as easy to get hold of which just leaves the issue of the framing. Can it be done cheaper than buying second hand containers? I am thinking its pretty close the only real difference being with a bit of luck the shipping container is guaranteed on its steel quality. Seeing how quickly things can deteriate here if not maintained properly as well as the fact many things are sub standard does make me worry about the steel. Can it be guaranteed to last?

I think the only people who can answer that is taking a visit to a fabrication plant and discussing it directly. Ignore sales people! you need to talk to the owners and see what guarantees they can offer. So why go with steel cladding instead of concrete?

  • Rapid installation.
  • Frame can be pre-fabricated offsite.
  • Internal walls can be thinner.
  • Exterior is easier to maintain and nicer finish than concrete.
  • Lightweight.
  • Wiring and pipework can be installed internally behind partition walling.

They are but a few things I can think of right now but there many more such as they don’t crack the way concrete does and do the insulation right you’ve got a better property for all weathers.

I am very keen on pre-fabricated houses that are dropped into place but also bearing in mind what if like many homes you drop the concrete slab on for a second floor to build later? This could actually be an easy solution as you can build the place on site if needed with basic hand tools. If there is no concrete floor for the 2nd level you could even remove the roof and drop a premade second floor straight on the support walls from below and having steel joists to support the floor.

A whole new angle here in the Philippines away from the original idea of shipping container housing. But it doesn’t mean we have given up but simply looking at what is most cost affective for our next project.

Podd – Australian Prefabricated Shipping Container Housing

podds - Shipping container homes Australia

Podd have also caught onto the niche of container/modular housing and are producing these modern designed homes for use in Australia. The construction takes an estimated 5 hours on site which isn’t bad going and internally looks great. The roof is also hydralulic to save time. Initially designed to help boost moral for mining employees but I can see a lot of people finding a use for these little homes.

The houses are made using shipping containers. The additional walls, ceilings, and floor structure are constructed using Austral exflam sandwich panel composite.

Podd Container housing - Kitchen and sitting room Podd Container housing - bedroom Podd Container housing - bathroom Podd Container housing - sitting area

Although the space seems small due to its design and colour and lighting affects the place does seem a lot bigger than it is. I love the design which is more inline with professional business than hobby farming or off-grid living. A rather unique shipping container house which others may find acceptable as a hotel chalet or conferencing rooms. Very professional finish love it!

Practical Houseboat for lake use

A floating home which appears mainly from timber construction but offers an interesting design for a home on waterways. No doubt could be adapted if not already to utilize sustainable materials. The home was actually prefabricated and travelled from the contractors workshop from another location on the lake. Although the timber frame also makes this a lighter home for construction, I am sure that shipping containers could be used in the same way as the shape of the home could easily be adapted to shipping container usage for recycling containers at the same time if looking to do something similar. Here in the Philippines for example timber isn’t always practical due to cost as well as termites. Which is the main reason most construction here is done in concrete.Practical Houseboat for lake usePractical Houseboat for lake usePractical Houseboat for lake use

Most people think of prefab construction as being off-site pieces assembled on site – floating a whole house was quite a task but saved time, energy and money in the long run. It is a rare building that can be more cheaply built to float than to sit on land.