Rooftop Hydroponic Garden In New York

 

Bell, Book and Candle, hydroponic garden,roof top garden,vertical gardening

Fresh produce is always the game of the day in a quality restaurant and New York restaurateur John Mooney has taken the concept to a modern dimension. The introduction of a rooftop hydroponic garden. This allows food being served at Bell, Book and Candle to have a large portion of its daily produce selected from its vertical roof top garden.

Vertical hydroponics is a fairly modern way of farming and maximising space but the original hydroponic technology linking plants with water isn’t as new as people think. But what has changed is the way people look at food and this is driving modern gardening technologies.

Another important aspect of hydroponics besides being able to grow things on your doorstep is that its also environmental with the reduced cost of water usage to conventional farming which can be using as little as 10% in comparison to large scale agriculture. The nutrient injections to the roots of plants mean they grow faster because they are right at the plants tips. This means for the plants they don’t need a huge root system but instead can concentrate on growth upside. The growth rates are generally double that of soil based plants.

Now the system being used at the restaurant is called Tower Gardens and come in at a hefty $499 a unit. Ok for commercial and restaurant growers but maybe a bit hefty for most households unless mix cropping. The system however uses aeroponics which instead of soaking the roots in water it sprays a mist at the plant roots. This gives high yields and extremly intense flavours for vegetables with very little waste.

Bell, Book and Candle, hydroponic garden,roof top garden,vertical gardening

Bell, Book and Candle, hydroponic garden,roof top garden,vertical gardening

Bell, Book and Candle, hydroponic garden,roof top garden,vertical gardening

Bell, Book and Candle, hydroponic garden,roof top garden,vertical gardening

Bell, Book and Candle, hydroponic garden,roof top garden,vertical gardening Bell, Book and Candle, hydroponic garden,roof top garden,vertical gardening
Bell, Book and Candle, hydroponic garden,roof top garden,vertical gardening Bell, Book and Candle, hydroponic garden,roof top garden,vertical gardening
Bell, Book and Candle, hydroponic garden,roof top garden,vertical gardening Bell, Book and Candle, hydroponic garden,roof top garden,vertical gardening
Bell, Book and Candle, hydroponic garden,roof top garden,vertical gardening Bell, Book and Candle, hydroponic garden,roof top garden,vertical gardening
 

Container housing in Texas – Cinco Camp

Cinco Camp - Shipping container home Texas

The thing about this concept is its something we are looking to do in the near future depending how the rest of our projects go. The roofing for example could have another use due to its span and that’s to add rainwater harvesting either for irrigation or things like toilets. The complete project came in at $200,000 and could have been halved if it wasn’t for the issues of location which left no man power in the area and access difficulties for transportation/machinery.

The concept has been simple which has raised the containers from the ground to reduce risks of bugs, snakes and rainwater but also to keep them individual units as this allows for moving to another site without too much damage to the environment. The inside of the units have been fitted out but at the same time the exteriors have been left pretty much intact.

All units are joined together by a simple decking area which I could see the opportunity of something like this in the Philippines as a simple retreat or cheap accommodation rentals with a bit of privacy.

why live in the middle of nowhere the photo from Texas says it all

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shipping container doors kept intact offer extra privacy as well as security and shade.

shipping container kitchen offers all mod cons although bulkier than I would like

Shipping container sitting room is made more homely by large wall graphic

All in all the whole idea makes a lot of sense to me with the maximising of space which also throws up the question how much stuff do we really need when most Western homes are at least 4 x the size of a container. Not only would downsizing save on the obvious of electricity, gas etc it also helps to reduce consumerism.