Manufactured Homes Part Of The Housing And Green Evolution

As I look at housing and the way its gone in the last 60 years there has been huge changes from the original prefabricated manufactured homes that were generally concrete built and primarily to house people after the bombings of WW2. Originally designed to be replaced at some point these manufactured homes have only recently started to see their demise and replacement of brick built skins going up the exterior before the removal of the concrete. They were never supposed to be up this long yet even now its still not difficult to find these types of homes in the UK and obviously partly to blame for the term “concrete jungle”. The 60s seen the rise of concrete being used for everything and the housing developments that were supposed to be the cities of the future ended up landing flat on their faces due to high crime, bad planning and poor construction.

Many lessons were learned then and even today things are still evolving, manufactured homes however are part of the housing market that probably can adapt faster than any other housing market as well as offering up and implementing many green solutions as they go. The big argument then is on the fuel usage to move the homes yet they have to be built somewhere and in a factory type condition where they are built in mass production wastage is minimised, labour maximised and new technologies easy to implement. One thing for sure is that its a market that is geared towards the customer to deliver what the customer needs which is another driving force in not only making the houses ultra modern but also extremely green in materials.

Manufactured homes are without a doubt one of the industries that can have a more positive impact on the housing market at the same time help others to improve their services as well. The cost reductions involved with pre-manufactured homes also allows labour savings which can be utilized somewhere else in the home such as adding solar panels or other technologies the house may have not thought of or couldn’t afford otherwise.

Is Container Living Green Enough?

When you go through shipping container homes you will find a trend in the majority of them that they are recycling and trying not to mess around with the area they are housed in, But is this enough?

Earlier looking at the shipping container house in Maui it hit me how they had added to the area by shading the building at the same time hiding it. What this also means is they had actually brought new plant life to the area as well as the new home.

Which gets me onto the subject of are we thinking enough “out of the box?” as obviously planning permissions and permits are often a headache but wouldn’t being over green actually hide the house and enhance the area making it harder for them to say no?

We are in the middle of a so called green revolution of some description, disappointedly it seems more of a middle class fad of fashion in the UK rather than actually trying to do our bit. Driving 20mins to offload the empty bottles at a bottle bank isn’t exactly helping the environment. In many cases the recycling isn’t even viable or green its more a case of “look we are trying something so give us a pat on the back”.

Don’t get me wrong I don’t have home knitted jumpers with a Greenpeace badge or smoke roll ups. I’m a realist not a green activist. For me its more about downsizing and being less of a consumer than bottle banks and paper recycling. Container homes are a step in the right direction but also have to think we could be doing more for the areas around our new container homes.