Own A Shipping Container Company?

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I was sitting looking at the number of emails I get from companies offering me container buildings, custom made containers and other modular structures from around the globe and although they all seem to be wanting to sell me something they forgot one thing. I’m not here to buy!

But if your willing to put together your own unique article I will add a new section into the blog so you can advertise your business and what you do. I can’t say fairer than that as it will have a better response than you spending $20 elsewhere on the planet for advertising.

What is the catch? There isn’t one for the readers they get to start seeing a picture of suppliers from around the globe develop on the site. From our perspective on Container Living we get a lot of unique content and an improved ranking for shipping containers for the website. So its a win for everyone and just as importantly $20 is within everyone’s budget.

If you want a bigger advertisement on a main page slot then its a different kettle of fish but still available but just not for $20. What your $20 will buy though is a permanent link to your website, telephone number, photos and a bit about your business and products. Which is why its important you take the time to create a good article for the site.

Now if your not good at the articles themselves then you can ask me to take a look at your photos etc. and build the article for you. But I think it would be better coming from yourselves as you know your company.

Shipping Container Dream Home.

With a budget of $150,000, Marti Montgomery used shipping containers to build a home on the land she’s dreamed of living on for decades. They had purchased the land during the 70s when it was much cheaper but now looking to take it from lot to a home. Another wonderful example of a shipping container turned into a home.

What do you think about the home is it suited to your lifestyle? Would you live in a shipping container home?

What is an expert in shipping container home conversions?

Matt Wilkie

Personally I am never keen on the word expert as I prefer that everyone keeps an open mind and constantly learning.

The fact is that container conversions are not a new technology but many of the products on the market to do with the conversions as well as the way people live and think have changed.

The other side of that being the arguments between what products to use and if they work or not. Ceramic paints for example are an on going argument. Personally I think multiple solutions to insulation are worth the effort but isn’t this all to do with container living?

The fact people have choice and more control over the home they are building?

Bit like people who say that its not viable and they get too hot yet I have just recently returned from Oman and guess what container units are used for workers all over the place. The company I was working for has their own pre-fabricated modular unit structures and that camp houses 5,000 people. So is it viable? Of course it is and extremely cost affective.

Even if you looked at container living for a short period of time as often you hear the 10 year life span of container units used. I would estimate this is based on little to no maintenance rather than regular. But even if you worked on that scenario and the cost of constructing the unit how much would you have saved in that period of time on what you would have spent on a mortgage elsewhere?

Basically for me an expert in container living needs to way up all the options and not what often seems to be narrow opinions. Because its not all about sustainability or living green. Sometimes its about cost affective other times bringing food to the arctic circle. There is no outright expert.

Container Homes Hit Vancouver!

container house,vancouver,shipping container housing,shipping container,home

We have had a few container homes in Canada but this is definitely the most recent. 12 Containers are being utilised to form social housing for women in the downtown Eastside of the city.

The project is looking to complete by April 2013 and is the brainchild of the Atira Women’s Resource society, which bought a lot in 2009 to build traditional housing.

The idea was put forward by the society to BC Hydro who were giving away two containers to a non-profit organisation. Which eventually seen a further two containers donated by Atira with the remainder being purchased from the Port of Vancouver.

The design has been modelled on existing shipping container homes in the Netherlands and Europe. Which to me makes sense as you learn from other peoples mistakes and experiences.

The residents will be women over the age of 55 who currently reside in a shelter.

“What we hope is to set up an intergenerational program,” Abbott said. “We have housing for young women next door and we’d like to set up mentoring relationships between them.”

The accommodation will see the older women paying $375 a month rent while younger tenants will be charged 30% of the market value to help pay the $500,000 mortgage on the project.

The containers which give a floor area of 320sqft are going to be stacked 3 high and offer private bathroom, kitchen and in-suite laundry to the tenants. Window coverings from floor to ceiling offer up a lot of light on the ends of the unit with an external staircase linking each unit.

There will be an open house on completion before the properties become occupied with an estimated $100,000 per unit in construction and material costs.

“While getting them here and getting them stacked is extremely satisfying and exciting, what I’m really looking forward to is handing over the keys to the women who will live there,” Abbott said from the site where the containers were being unloaded Friday.

On a green note if the containers hadn’t become housing they would have very likely been shipped back to Asia and eventually melted down as scrap. That’s if they didn’t sit at some port rusting away.

Shipping container houses are still a bit of a Taboo subject when people talk and think about housing but good to see the market is changing. Not only for recycling but also container housing often means downsizing the excess that people often live with. So whatever way you look at it container housing offers some valuable and environmental lessons for sustainable living.

Container Buildings Oman

As I was up in our transport office (some of you are probably not aware I am currently working in Dubai and Oman) but noticed some container units had turned up and were busy having electrical wiring done.

They are from another site where we have worker camps and currently these are being moved off site as the construction project is finished. Nearly 500 of these units.

Portacabin - Oman

Container building Oman

Sturdy and clean due to the design but also gave the opportunity to show what you can do with sandwich panels you find in things like cold room stores at restaurants. As changing the type of panelling on the units that are foam centred in a slot wall system does give quite a nice finish.Container building inside,Oman

Internally looking just as clean and fresh as well as functional. As you can see the wiring is on going and the electrician was wondering why I was poking my head round the corner taking photos.

Sandwich panels used in container buildings

Would have to look at changing the roof design if building these though. But the photo also lets you see what the end of the foam panels look like.

Gets back to the argument often used where people say that they are too hot to live in. Well after several month out in the desert and also spending time in portacabins for accommodation on sites we were surveying I can honestly say the containers work! We have had temperatures above 50 degrees and sandstorms and the containers stand strong and offer comfortable living.

Oman And Shipping Container Buildings.

My three months in Oman on contract has been an interesting time as I have travelled large parts of the country. From Muscat to 1000km away into the desert with many places in between.

A bit of time in the oil fields I can see there is a market for container buildings and not just in accommodation and offices. One of the biggest problems I faced was related to health and making sure I got enough daily fruit and vegetables.

It got me thinking about the issues relating to large scale camps and improving diet. How many lost work days are caused by a weak immune system or other diet issues?

This is where I think trying to promote shipping container gardening would work well. For other areas maybe electricity is an issue as the energy used could be expensive. But in reality there is excess power due to by products from oil removal actually being used to run turbines so power isn’t a problem at all. Transportation is for getting goods to the remote locations and so is it generally in Oman as its a fairly dry hot country.

Shipping container food production however could actually give great rewards by reducing the amount of sick days people are likely to have but also improve peoples health and wellbeing. Will be pushing the idea forward as part of my recommendations before I leave the country for the Philippines.

Also there are issues of subsidence relating to the fact many structures are quite literally built on sand. Modular or container construction could also be a way round many of these issues as they are more robust but just as important can be moved when needed.

Work camps work well here and impressed with the rapid setup of structures. Setting a steel frame structure up then over cladding gives a clean living space which is also very strong and functional. Will drop some photos later as I need to get the camera from one of my work colleagues.

How To Build A Shipping Container Internet Cafe [Video]

These projects are being done by a UK Based charity their website seems to be a work in progress but the concept of the conversion of a shipping container as you can see is a lot more simple than many people realise. Not sure about the solar panel side of things as they don’t have a battery backup as well as no ventilation for the heat build up from the computers in the container.

But then again I am not in Africa and acclimatised to the environment as the kids there may not even notice. I have computers here in the Philippines which are in arcade boxes sat outside the home. I can’t go there because of the mosquitos they seem to love my white legs, but the local kids will sit there for hours completely undisturbed as they are used to it but also I have noticed that with some things locals don’t seem to get affected the same way. Red ants for example I was stood near a beach and they were climbing all over my feet and biting me. But I could see my wife’s feet they actually just went round. Haven’t a clue what the difference was but its happened with other things as well.

Anyway getting off tangent! The shipping container internet cafe is obviously a project that is already working and spreading computer training into developing nations. But another area people often overlook when sending aid is why not convert the containers in advance then load them with the materials that they are sending for projects? Instead of shipping the container back it stays and actually becomes part of the community. For example this where its all panelled and ready to be used as an internet cafe but could just as easily have the far end prepped for shipping with the computers etc. and the rest of the container utilised for sending other materials and equipment.

Shipping Container Homes Flexibility In Being Modular.

Shipping container homes are the home of the future due to their extremely flexible structures.

Although many people have an idea of what their ideal home looks like in their mind ask them to sketch or design it and things start becoming rather foggy. In reality we are often told things or fed things via media without even realising it. Is your ideal home for example going to have a rather pitched roof? Why is that? This is a typical example of what I am talking about as its a TV stereotype that is often seen as the home we want. There is no real reason the roof has to have a pitch in the way people imagine except for the fact we are pre-programmed with many things as right and wrong without any thought to does it really make any difference?

In reality we are often put off things as being a bad idea or not the norm because everything is based round particular social designs and thoughts. But the funniest thing here being that shipping containers can be modular design and this is why it also fits into this even though its thinking out of the box.

The modular way to join containers side by side or stack means people can physically imagine an object when designing a shipping container home. Measurements are fixed into each container giving you fixed measurements for each module in the home.

What can put people off though is the space odd thing is living in Asia I have seen people living in single rooms with 6 – 10 people and pretty much everything is in that room including cooking facilities. That is taking minimal living to the extreme but the point being homes have gotten bigger and bigger over time. Yet our debts have grown with them as well forcing up land and home values with it and for what? Its an artificially inflated market and I am much  happier if living in a 4 bedroom home with 3 rooms rented out paying my mortgage off. Than I would be with an empty 4 bedroom house where I am working night and day to pay for it.

Quality of life is all depending on the routes you take in life, modular shipping container housing can give you low cost housing that can be adapted and extended as a family grows.

“Eco-Pak” shipping container home design.

shipping container home with steel beam framing

The original prototype Eco-Pak house constructed in Turkey throws up some interesting ideas about shipping container home design due to not only making the shipping container part of the home. But also the fact that you can utilise the shipping container to transport a lot of the equipment and materials required for the build. Looking at the steel frame work design it does appear that it can all fit inside the container. For the first fix it could allow the starting on the project as soon as the container arrives with a secure storage area.

The “Eco-Pak” development was the brainchild of an aircraft structural engineer James Green of Building Container LLC. The system has a U.S. patent with international patents pending, James teamed up with Seattle-based architect Matthew Coates to develop the system. Its primary goals were to make a building that was low cost, structurally sound as well as transportable without the need of a concrete base.

shipping container home with steel beam framing

shipping container home with steel beam framing

The flexibility of the steel design allows for many variables and all delivered via the shipping container unit that comes with the building. A prototype version will be put together in 2013 by Coates Design in the Seattle area.

Source: Coates Design, Building Container