Manufactured Homes Part Of The Housing And Green Evolution

As I look at housing and the way its gone in the last 60 years there has been huge changes from the original prefabricated manufactured homes that were generally concrete built and primarily to house people after the bombings of WW2. Originally designed to be replaced at some point these manufactured homes have only recently started to see their demise and replacement of brick built skins going up the exterior before the removal of the concrete. They were never supposed to be up this long yet even now its still not difficult to find these types of homes in the UK and obviously partly to blame for the term “concrete jungle”. The 60s seen the rise of concrete being used for everything and the housing developments that were supposed to be the cities of the future ended up landing flat on their faces due to high crime, bad planning and poor construction.

Many lessons were learned then and even today things are still evolving, manufactured homes however are part of the housing market that probably can adapt faster than any other housing market as well as offering up and implementing many green solutions as they go. The big argument then is on the fuel usage to move the homes yet they have to be built somewhere and in a factory type condition where they are built in mass production wastage is minimised, labour maximised and new technologies easy to implement. One thing for sure is that its a market that is geared towards the customer to deliver what the customer needs which is another driving force in not only making the houses ultra modern but also extremely green in materials.

Manufactured homes are without a doubt one of the industries that can have a more positive impact on the housing market at the same time help others to improve their services as well. The cost reductions involved with pre-manufactured homes also allows labour savings which can be utilized somewhere else in the home such as adding solar panels or other technologies the house may have not thought of or couldn’t afford otherwise.

Maximising space inside a shipping container home

The problem in the West we think home we think big.. we think of more and excess and the “we can’t live without items”. But then again how many of those items can you really live without?

Once you have an idea of reduction you have a step forward in the way your container home can be.

best use of a small space bed,wardrobe and bedside tableHere you can see the bed, small steps and side table alongside a wardrobe. Maximising the width of a small space. Underneath the bed is the storage space which is ideal for those with luggage and I can see this being used in things like modular hotel systems.

under bed storage space wash basin and hob combination

 Combining wash and cooking facilities into one reduces space drastically as generally we are doing one or the other so makes sense. At the same time strongly advise good earthing (ground) to reduce risk of electrocution.

You have to remember you may be losing some of the worldly goods of excess inside but you are gaining the environment on the outside allowing living spaces such as gardens and views over a concrete jungle.