Variations In Shipping Container Construction

The development of the shipping container industry threw up some interesting design problems as its own success then began the need of variations in shipping container construction. Customers had different needs and its surprising that the industry managed to keep within its standard design structure with such needs. At the same time more modifications to the standards had to be added as new problems developed that hadn’t been seen with such things as the corner standard fittings you see on the shipping containers, but nobody had assessed maximum payloads and containers began to fail because they hadn’t been tested to high stress levels and needs of customers demands. As these failings became apparent the International Standards Organisation was swift to step up the specifications on the standards and the quality and strength of shipping containers improved.

The next issue involved railroad cars as there needed to be shipping container reinforcements on the end plates as the containers had extra pressure added when the railroad cars hitched and unhitched costing around an extra $100 per shipping container.

The next issue was standardising the lengths of units to fit into all shipping situations and this seen the rise of five initial standard shipping containers develop :-

  • 20 ft (6.1m)
  • 40 ft (12.2m)
  • 45 ft (13.7m)
  • 48 ft (14.6m)
  • 53 ft (16.2m)

The matrix of shipping containers were designed so that they would fit into most fitting needs and being able to interlock the different sizes within ships without difficulty. The U.S. prefers the larger shipping containers while Europe prefers 40ft containers. Adding to this was the weight restrictions to keep the shipping containers manageable but also within restrictions such as road limits for freight this seen the following standard shipping container weights develop :-

  • 20 foot: 52,910 lbs/24,000 kg
  • 40 foot: 67,200 lbs/30,480 kg
  • 45 foot: 67,200 lbs/30,480 kg
  • The net load totals are:
  • 20 foot: 48,060 lbs/21,600 kg
  • 40 foot: 58,820 lbs/26,500 kg
  • 45 foot: 56,620 lbs/25,680 kg

The development of the shipping container has seen two materials mainly in use Aluminium and Steel. Most common being steel as it handles the bashing of shipping container needs as well as still functionally light and a cheap material. Aluminium is a more expensive solution but doesn’t suffer with the obvious rust problems that steel does. In recent years though Corten steel has seen its entry onto the market place which is rust and mould proof making it the most practical solution.

20ft Shipping containers for sale P60,000 each may vary in price recommend email for confirmation of availability–Cebu, Philippines

 

 

20-foot-ground-storage-container-20-foot-iso-shipping-container

Part of the shipping container housing we are looking to do is to encourage others to get involved and DIY (do it yourself!) which is why this project has come up which is basically we supply “SECONDHAND” containers at P60,000 each now these have been used and will be battered in some way no doubt but you have to remember your cladding over the exterior/interior and on top of that they were designed for ship travelling in some of the worst conditions on the planet. Doesn’t mean they are going to be battered to death but it does mean that your buying a pretty indestructible module if you take care of it. Rust issues will be minimalized due to the type of steel involved and like most things its all about preparation rather than finish.

So if your looking for a 20ft container they are P60,000+ delivery we also provide 40ft but due to the road conditions within Cebu I would recommend buying 2 20ft and welding them together as getting a truck with HIAB (crane) is possible or even using a forklift or backhoe to unload and move to final destination where as using 40ft containers the issues become more complex.

Email :- Matt_Wilkie@hotmail.co.uk

Large conventional styled shipping container home 12 x 40ft containers.

Another fine example of taking what seems to be a stack of containers into a luxury home. As you can see in the photo there is no fancy shapes or designs in the structure but actually doing what containers do and stacking them. A few of the container sides have been removed to open up the rooms.large shipping container home 12x40ft container home

As the roof is added the home starts to take shape an added bonus to the shipping container structure is that the extra strength in recycling the containers actually makes the roof structure strong enough to add a green roof.large shipping container home 12x40ft container home

In the third photo you can really see the home start to look like a luxury house at this stage its a case of adding insulation cover and/or over cladding www.sgblocks.com who design these homes say that for energy efficency adding the appropriate coatings you can see a reflection rate of around 95% on exterior radiation as well as a strong resistance to lose interior heat/cooling. On top of that a great infiltration barrier against water.

large shipping container home 12x40ft container home

One thing for sure with the world recession in play many people have woken up to the practical uses of using shipping containers as homes.

Shipping container specifications

shipping container specifications

Even though standardisation of shipping containers has been in existence since 1967 its still not as specific as it may seem. Most people recognise 20ft and 40ft containers but in reality they vary between 10ft and 53ft in length (10ft are very common here in the Philippines for small loads). The heights also vary from 4.25ft to 9.5 so if buying a container getting the exact metrics internally and externally are important otherwise you could end up buying something unsuitable for your needs. The only thing that does seem to be standard is width at 8ft, what the containers are made from and internal dimensions vary between manufacturers and companies needs.

An example of this is Matson’s who after calculating the best sizes of container for their operations along the West coast of Hawaii set upon using 20ft and 24ft containers that fitted their converted freighters from WW2 and integrated a racking system into the freighters specifically for the containers. This allowed the containers to be stacked six high and to be easily offloaded at the dock side using specialist crane equipment.

4 x 40ft shipping container home design idea

When starting to design a shipping container home its always good to have a starting point, an idea from where to build from. I came across this home which has dimensions that doing the build with 4 x 40ft containers would actually give you a bigger home than it but the design throws up a home that is a bit unique and its porch deck area which is another feature that could be utilized doing it with shipping containers is an added bonus. Creating the frame then dropping the containers onto the frame before welding them together would give you a straight surface to mount the containers. Utilizing the roof space as well you can set it up with solar panels and have the house installed with 12v lighting. In fact the house below is running on solar energy and is located in the Mojave Desert. Built by Blue Sky Homes its a simple and unique 2 bedroom home that pretty much offers everything a couple would need.shipping container home idea from desert home

 house design plans container home idea porchdining room bedroom bathroom sitting room balcony house view

Liray House – Shipping Container Home By Proyecto ARQtainer In Chile

Shipping container home - Liray House by Ruben Rivera Peede - Chile

This shipping container home in Chile was created by architect Ruben Rivera Peede named “Liray House”. Its base size had to be no more than 115m2 and very low cost in construction with a completion price of $75,000. It was constructed in less than 3 months on a lot of 6775m2 with the property being located in an eastern corner to give the best views of the Andes mountian.

5 containers were used to construct the home as well as it being raised 55cm off the ground. This not only allows passive air movement but also reduces risk of damp as well as allowing things like plumbing pipes to be installed easily as most work was carried out off site. 2 40ft containers make up the bedrooms while 3 other containers create the living spaces. The original container flooring was removed and replaced with hardwood. This is probably to do with toxins within the floor rather than anything else as it could have been boarded over.

On the insulation side Projected Cellulose was used which has an internal density of 45 to 60kg/m3. It helps reduce heat build up as well as heat loss depending on the time of year. It also removes hollow sounds from the building as well as being extremely fireproof. Another important factor is that Corten steel is used in the shipping containers as this is a rust proof and highly damp proof material. Always worth checking the “structure” of a shipping container and either go for Corten or Aluminium.

Source :- Ruben Rivera Peede

Shipping container home - Liray House by Ruben Rivera Peede - Chile Shipping container home - Liray House by Ruben Rivera Peede - Chile  Shipping container home - Liray House by Ruben Rivera Peede - Chile Shipping container home - Liray House by Ruben Rivera Peede - Chile Shipping container home - Liray House by Ruben Rivera Peede - Chile Shipping container home - Liray House by Ruben Rivera Peede - Chile Shipping container home - Liray House by Ruben Rivera Peede - Chile Shipping container home - Liray House by Ruben Rivera Peede - Chile Shipping container home - Liray House by Ruben Rivera Peede - Chile Shipping container home - Liray House by Ruben Rivera Peede - Chile Shipping container home - Liray House by Ruben Rivera Peede - Chile Shipping container home - Liray House by Ruben Rivera Peede - Chile Shipping container home - Liray House by Ruben Rivera Peede - Chile Shipping container home - Liray House by Ruben Rivera Peede - Chile Shipping container home - Liray House by Ruben Rivera Peede - Chile Shipping container home - Liray House by Ruben Rivera Peede - Chile Shipping container home - Liray House by Ruben Rivera Peede - Chile

40ft Dry Freight Shipping Container dimensions

40ft dry freight shipping container

40′ Dry Freight Shipping Container

When looking for the correct dimensions on a shipping container its always worth noting the height,thickness of steel and its general structure as there are many variables including the fact although the connections in the corner are always in the same place height can vary.

Ratings

Maximum Gross Weight: 67,200 lbs.
Tare Weight: 7,782 lbs.
Payload: 59,417 lbs.
Capacity: 2,376 cu. ft.

Internal Dimensions

Length: 39′ 1"
Width: 7′ 6"
Height: 7′ 8"

External Dimensions

Length: 40′
Width: 8′
Height: 8′ 6"

Door Opening

Width: 7′ 6"
Height: 7′ 4"

Infill Container Home Designed by Leger Wanaselja – San Francisco bay, U.S.A.

This project was based on three shipping containers from which home designer Leger Wanaselja transformed into a luxury modular home. Its located on eastern hills above San Francisco Bay. The advantage of using shipping containers in this design is that it offers a structured uniform look that only adds to the buildings character as well as the containers themselves are ideal for this purpose due to the design and nature of them because they exceed many of the building standards that would be required for construction at the same time cheap to work with and buy.

How the containers are used is 2 40ft containers are stacked while on the other side another 40ft was cut and stacked leaving the central area as the sitting room and stairwell area which was opened up by a high glass wall from floor to ceiling.

 

Infill Container Home Design by Leger Wanaselja

 

Infill Container Home Design by Leger Wanaselja Infill Container Home Design by Leger Wanaselja    Infill Container Home Design by Leger Wanaselja Infill Container Home Design by Leger Wanaselja

Infill Container Home Design by Leger Wanaselja